Xiaosaurus

Xiaosaurus (Zhou-SAWR-us) is a small, lightly-built dinosaur. It is an herbivore and a fast, agile runner. It is small and lizard-like, about 5 feet (1.5 m) long, one foot high and weighs about 15 lbs. It walks on two long legs, has four-toed feet, five-fingered hands, short arms, a long, stiff, pointed tail, a flexible neck, and a small head with large eyes. It has leaf-shaped cheek teeth. They pose no threat in the wild but can be a nuisance in urban areas.

ST: 4 HP: 4 Speed: 7.25

DX: 16 Will: 2 Move: 7

IQ: 2 Per: 12

HT: 10 FP: 10 SM: -4

Dodge: 9 Parry: n/a DR: 1

Attack (Skill or Resistance):

  • Bite: 1d-6 cr SL: 16
  • Kick: 1d-5 cut, Reach: C,1, SL: 14
  • Tail Lash: 1d-4 cr, SL: 14
  • Claws: 1d-6 cut SL: 16

Traits: Acute Taste & Smell 1 [2, B35]; Bestial -10 [B124]; Cannot Speak -15 [B125]; Claws, Sharp (Feet) [3, B42]; Combat Reflexes 15 [B43]; Damage Resistance 1 – Tough Skin, -40% [3, B47]; Fit 5 [B55]; Hidebound -5 [B138]; Penetrating Voice [1, B101]; Peripheral Vision 15 [B74]; Restricted Diet (Herbavore) [-20, B151]; Striker, Crushing (Tail) 5 [B88]; Taboo Trait (Fixed IQ) 0 [B263]; Teeth, Blunt [0, B91]

Skills: Brawling DX+0 [1, B182]; Survival (choose one) Per-1 [1, B223]; Tracking Per-1 [1, B226]

Class:Dinosaur, Animal

Elmisaurus

I have two types of DF games. One is kept completely underground, the other is a standard fantasy world except horses are rare.  Instead dinosaurs are the main beasts of burden and wilderness threat.  The Elmisaurus is one of the animals that has been domesticated in my campaigns.  They can be found in cities and almost all Elmisaurus (EL-mih-SAWR-us) you will come across are domesticated pets. They are great at catching unwanted pests such as rats and Xiaosaurus. They are 6.6 feet long, about 3 feet at the shoulder a weigh in at 70-100 lbs. They come in a dazzling display of patterns and are normally light purple, white, black with small in frequent orange spots. In the wild they are generally found in Warm temperate areas and are found in small groups 1d+2. They rarely attack humans unless they outnumber the target and are extremely hungry.

ST: 9 HP: 9 Speed: 7.25

DX: 16 Will: 3 Move: 7

IQ: 3 Per: 12

HT: 13 FP: 13 SM: 0

Dodge: 10 Parry: n/a DR: 1

Attack (Skill or Resistance):

  • Claws, Sharp: 1d-2 cut C,1
  • Striker, Tail: 1d-1 cr C,1
  • Teeth, Sharp: 1d-3 cut C

Traits: Acute Taste & Smell 1 [2, B35]; Bestial -10 [B124]; Cannot Speak -15 [B125]; Claws, Sharp (Feet) 5 [B42] Claws, Blunt (Hands) [3, B42]; Combat Reflexes 15 [B43]; Damage Resistance 1 – Tough Skin, -40% [3, B47]; Fit 5 [B55]; Hidebound -5 [B138]; Peripheral Vision 15 [B74]; Restricted Diet (Carnivore or Herbavore) -20 [B151]; Striker, Crushing (Tail) 5 [B88]; Taboo Trait (Fixed IQ) 0 [B263]; Teeth, Sharp 1 [B91]or Teeth, Blunt [0, B91]

Skills: Brawling DX+0 [1, B182]; Stealth DX-1 [1, B222]; Survival (choose one) Per-1 [1, B223]; Tracking Per-1 [1, B226]

Class: Dinosaur, Animal

Notes: Omnivore

Battle Tile Tokens

To reduce the extremely large number of tiles I’m creating I’m adding tokens around the tiles.  It may use a bit more ink but it also allows you to get more out of your photo paper as well.  The tokens will allow you to place stairs, traps, treasure, etc. anywhere you want on your tiles.

Door Tokens

 These three style door tokens will allow you place your doors within any area on the tiles for the wider Vertical Corridors.  Carefully cut them out with a hobby knife using proper safety procedures and you can then either glue one side and fold in half on the grey dotted line or cut them in half and glue them on to thicker card. The backs of the tokens will have information on the type of door.  To make this easier and more customizable for those of you using the tiles all token pdf’s will be form fillable. Which means you can enter your own data. The center token in the picture above is how they will all look with blank data fields where as the other two is a representation of how they will look with the information inserted by the user.

Test it out on this pdf for yourself!  You will have to download the pdf, Google Docs won’t let you use the form features in the preview.

Because the Horizontal Corridors have to be slightly reduced in width I have created two types of door tokens for each door type. These also will have a form option on the reverse side.

Here are some of the options you can place from getting from one level to another.  I manipulated the pit images in photoshop.  The top one is a pit down to another corridor directly below it and the bottom one is just a deep pit.  I probably should have placed a skeleton on the bottom for scale. If you fold the pit symbols on the grey lines and glue the trap door parts together then glue the bottom (pitt symbol) to a piece of thick card you can have a pit tile with a working door!

Now to make sure that the pdf’s can be used by both A4 and 8.5″x11″ I’ve placed a red rectangle on my sheet representing the size of 8.5″ by 11″. This will make sure none of the pieces will be cut off due to size. Everyone will have to print them with no margins though.

I’d be interested to know what kind of tokens people would like to see.

7″ Battle Tiles

I’ve gotten some positive feedback from my 7″ tiles so I thought maybe I could round them out a bit more before continuing on with the 4″ battle tiles.  To organise things I started to plan out some of the shapes in Adobe illustrator.  Here are just some of the tiles I’ve come up with for double wide corridors (6′)

So just a few!  I’ve color coded them based on how many corridor connections are available.  Here is just a quick example of what could be created with these tiles.

I’ve also been cleaning up the tiles a bit by adding another layer to hide unused grids. I think it looks much cleaner with the new build.

I’ve also been working on adding a bit of dirt and grime, not to all tiles as you really need generic tiles, but just a few of them. By creating a ‘Dirt’ layer with different transparencies and edge faders it can make some tiles look really disused.

Also with Campaign Cartographer I can easily change the backgrounds to allow for different style maps.

Want to plan your dungeon?  Check out my hex graph paper that I made in Illustrator.

Now this is where I’m going to get a bit cheeky.  I’d like to offer these in black & White OSR style which Profantasy Software has in The Cartographer’s Annual 2015 so if you can spare the dosh and donate a couple of quid (dollars) then I’ll be able to get a few new styles and offer those up for free like I do with all my hobby designs.

paypal.me/JCMorrison

 

7 inch hex Battle Tiles

I’d like to share the 7 inch hex Battle Tiles that I made back in 2009. You can read about it HERE on the Profantasy forums.

You can get them HERE

For more information on the battle tiles click on the tags to other posts concerning Geomorphs.

If you end up using them please share pictures and if you tend to use them often and you need a new tile then please let me know and I’ll whip one up for you.

Hand Drawn Map

I got bored at work so I drew this dungeon using tiles from the 4″ Hex Geomorphs.  The nice thing about hand drawing them is it allowed me to see that I could come up with a few new tiles that will increase the modular construction of the dungeons.  This is only like my second time trying the cross hatch fill that is really popular these days. I still need more practice at it.

I made a portrait and landscape versions of the hex grid in Adobe Illustrator and you can download the pdf HERE

My Thoughts on 7″ Hex Battle Tiles

In my last post I gave a brief overview of how my different hex dungeon maps evolved.  This time I just want to discuss briefly on some hex maps but mostly the 7 inch hex tile.  There are two ways to place a hex onto a map.  Vertical and Horizontal sometimes referred to Flat to Flat and Point to Point.  Now if you are using your map for miniatures the standard movement is 1 inch for the base.  If you want to the distance from top of your tile to the bottom of the tile to be 1 inch this means you have two different possible sizes for your hex.  However most people would just stick with the 1 inch distance flat to flat as that will perfectly allow even miniatures with round bases to fit within the entirety of the hex.  Not to mention that a 1 inch Vertical hex tile is the industry standard for miniature bases.

I’ve heard some people refer to them the opposite way but I view it as the direction of travel in a straight line via the flat edge.  Very few games that I can recall use the Horizontal grid.  I’ve mostly seen older wargames that use counters, Star Maps (although can use both), and probably most recognised in the gaming community Icosahedral World Maps.  I’m sure I’m missing a few.

icosahedral world map using Horizontal Hex Grid

However if your playing with miniatures on a battle map you really want to have a facing edge.  Also I play GURPS which uses Vertical Hexes if players want to use battle maps. So that narrowed my choices down to, well, one.

Now in my previous posts I’ve mentioned how I used hex grids on square mats and the problems that can lead to as you need duplicate maps for each directions as each square would have half hexes and quarter hexes.  It really wasn’t ideal.

1) Square tile, hex grid
2) Rooms cut to fit, hex grid
3) Flower Tiles
4) Hex Tiles

I did experiment with Flower Tiles.  I liked Flower Tiles as they are interlocking but you would require a larger number of varied tiles to make a proper system and it was just too much.  I wanted something simpler.

Flower Tiles

Flower Tiles interlocking

Then I came across the idea, after discussions with Andorax (a World Works Games forum user), to use Hex Tiles.  This allowed me to rotate the hexes in any direction and have all the tiles line up.  The only thing we disagreed on was whether to use Horizontal or Vertical.  I prefer the Vertical so I went with that.

There is a great blog post by Phil Wright “Mapping with Master Hexes” where he goes into in depth detail about how to choose the proper tile size.  I’d like to say I did the same thing but honestly I just got lucky.  I wanted to fit a tile on a sheet of paper with as little waste so for A4 or US 8.5×11 that ended up being a 7″ Vertical Tile.  I’ve made dozens of these tiles and even printed out a few on good quality photo paper. Most Wargames are done in 6 inch sections however that just won’t work with a 6 inch hex tile. As with a square tile the 6 inch hex tile has too many irregularities for it to be functional. 4″, 7″ are best.  you could use 10″ and 13″ but that is starting to get a bit large for me.  5″ hexes would also be feasible but it personally did not suit me.

7″ Vertical Hex tile made in Campaign Cartographer 3

120° Corridor

The Horizontal corridor is not as wide as the Vertical corridor

Now I refused to be confined to all my corridors turning at 60° and 120°.  However because of the 120° angle of the outer edges it means that the corridors meet at a slant. If the walls are all the same, then the walls cutting across the angle wouldn’t match up with the walls that hit it flat on.  So this means all horizontal, or cross cutting would be a better term, corridors have to be slightly smaller.  I’m crap at maths, I’m a visual guy so I kept scaling until it looked right.  It is roughly 13-15% difference in size depending on the width of the corridors.

First off I should clarify that in GURPS each hex is 3 feet.  Which is about the area that a normal human would occupy.  So with the seven inch tiles it allowed me to have 3′, 6′, and 9′ corridors and with the 7 inch tile I could off an array of options of how the corridors connect.

Corridor connecting guide for 7 inch tiles

I also experimented on how to use a standard dungeon map and force it onto the 7 inch tiles.  This takes away modularity but makes for some fun map tiles that only work for a specific map.

This map was randomly generated using http://donjon.bin.sh/d20/dungeon/ then placed into multiple 7 inch battle tiles

How a few tiles repeated over and over can create a maze.

Pro’s and Con’s of the 7″ Tiles

Pro

  • multiple corridor widths
  • multiple connecting points
  • able to make both large and small rooms
  • quick to assemble

Con

  • Dense dungeons with small rooms require many special tiles that will contain a whole room plus many half or quarter rooms.  This would require plenty of planning and tiles with specific use.
  • tiles may reveal rooms which have not been discovered
  • if full 3D can get heavy

However with my purchase of Kickstarter for Tabletop Hex Terrain I’ve started to think about moving to smaller 4 inch hex tiles.  However not just flat tiles but full three dimensional dungeons.  This idea was reinforced when the Hexomorfo System was released. Plus 4 inch tiles would allow me to fit the wargaming niche as well because I could build them in one foot sections. However 4 inch battle tiles is a discussion for another post.

LINKS

Game Dev “Vertical vs. Horizontal”

Mapping with Master Hexes by Phil Wright.  This is a great blog post and gets more indepth than I did for the actual reason for the size of my tiles.

Bat in the Attic “Mapping with Hexes”

Understanding Hexagon Tiles

Red Blog Games

Hexagon Measurement Calculator

 

Scavenger (Diablo I-III)

“Scavengers are ugly, pathetic creatures who survive off of carrion and corpses too diseased to attract any other carnivores. I did once meet a raggedy fellow who claimed that he had trained one of the beasts to bring him large rats to eat, but I’m sure the story is utter nonsense.”
— Abd al-Hazir

Scavengers are ugly creatures who survive off of carrion and corpses too diseased to attract any other carnivores. Unlike most carnivores of this type however, they are extremely aggressive and will not hesitate to attack those unfortunate enough to encounter them.

Scavengers have powerful legs which they use for swift springing attacks, striking at vulnerable faces and throats. Their anatomy bears a striking resemblance to that of the leapers of the Aranoch desert, and thus, many researchers classify the two groups as part of the same family of creatures.

Scavengers are more dangerous than they seem. They move with blinding speed and often swarm their prey with their numbers. They make difficult targets due to their speed, their constant moving, and their ability to burrow.

ST: 7    HP: 10   Speed:6.25
DX: 12 Will: 6    Move:6
IQ: 6     Per: 8
HT: 11   FP: 11   SM:-2
Dodge: 9 Parry: 9 DR: 1
Attack (Skill or Resistance): Claws: 1d-4 cut; Bite 1d-4 cut
Traits: Acute Hearing 3; Acute Vision 3; Animal (Bestial, Cannot Speak, Hidebound, No Fine Manipulators); Appearance (Hideous); Claws (sharp); Damage Resistance 1; Fur; Night Vision 3; Super Jump 1; Teeth (sharp); Tunneling (Tunneling Move +4)
Skills: Brawling-12; Jumping-15; Running-12; Stealth-12; Swimming-11
Class: Dire
Notes:Unwilling to negotiate. Truly evil

A standing Super Jump is 1yd, 1ft. High Jump: 1yd, 2ft, 3in, In-Air Speed: 5.85 yd/s

Burning Dead (Diablo II)

The Burning Dead are skeletons whos bones are burning constantly.  Anyone touching the aura or within close combat will take damage.  This includes weapons striking the Burning Dead. If that wasn’t bad enough once the Burning Dead reach 0 HP they will explode causing burning damage and hot bone fragments.  One vulnerability is they can not be equipped with any armor as it interferes with their exploding ability when they die. Another vulnerability is water which causes considerable damage. Weapons they use must not contain combustible items and as such most weapons are steel or iron with nothing special on the grips and are usually heavily damaged from the constant heat. Soft metals should not be used either.

They have a considerable resistance to heat and fire which allows them to be placed in groups without damaging each other.

Template: Burning Dead (Skeleton) -123 points

Attribute Modifiers: ST-1; DX+2; IQ-2

Secondary Characteristic Modifiers: Basic Speed+1

Advantages: Doesn’t Breathe; Doesn’t Eat or Drink; Doesn’t Sleep; DR 2; DR: 10 (Limited Heat/Fire); Flaming Bite (Burning Attack); High Pain Threshold; Immunity to Metabolic Hazards; Immunity (All mind control); Innate Attack: Flaming Aura [13]; Innate Attack: Explodes on Death [9]; Indomitable; Injury Tolerance (No Blood, No Brain, No Eyes,
No Vitals, Unliving); Single-Minded; Temperature Tolerance 10; Unaging; Unfazeable; Vacuum Support

Disadvantages: Appearance (Monstrous; Universal, +25%); Automaton; Cannot Learn; Dependency (Mana; common, constantly); Fragile (Brittle); Fragile (Unnatural);
Mute; No Sense of Smell/Taste; Reprogrammable; Skinny; Social Stigma (Dead); Unhealing (Total); Vulnerability (Crushing Attacks; x2); Weakness: Water (1d per minute) Occasional; Wealth (Dead Broke)

Quirks: Cannot Float; Sexless

Features: Affected by Control Zombie, Pentagram, and Turn Zombie; No mental skills; Skull has only 2 total DR

Flaming Aura: Innate Attack: 1D burn (Cyclic: 1 sec +100%, Aura +80%, Melee Attack: Reach C -30%) [13]

Explodes on Death: Innate Attack: 2D-3 burn (Incendiary +10%, Explosion: 1 +50%, Fragmentation (Hot Fragments) +15%; Trigger: Common (on death) -20%) [9].  Those caught within 2 yards will take 2d-3 Burn damage in the same hex, 2d-3/3 for 1 hex away, and 2d-3/6 points of damage 2 yards away. Fragmentation Hot Fragments: Cyclic (Six 10-second cycles) is 5 yards and taking 1d(0.2) burn damage if hit.

Source: Magic [152], Diablo I & II

Plague Bearer (Diablo II)

The Plague Bearer looks no different from other Zombies with the exception of what appear to be fresh puss filled boils on their body.  When they touch exposed flesh they transfer a deadly disease to their victims.  This Plague is magical in nature and can only be caught by direct contact from the original host (the Plague Bearer) material.  So an individual who has caught the plague can not spread it to another person.  However touching any of the original material will infect a person.  Whether it is from direct contact from the Plague Bearer or from accidentally touching the remains of the Plague Bearer such as its corpse (you must burn the corpse to make it free from containment), or even by cleaning off your equipment after battling one.  One Plague Bearer shuffling through a town could infect anywhere from 5-50 victims. Thankfully they are easy to spot/smell.

Template: Plague Bearer (Zombie) -64 Points

Attribute Modifiers: ST +1 [10]; IQ -3 [-60];

Secondary Characteristic Modifiers: HP +5 [10]

Advantages: Doesn’t Breathe; Doesn’t Eat or Drink; Doesn’t Sleep;  High Pain Threshold; Immunity to Metabolic Hazards; Immunity (All Mind Control); Innate Attack [6]; Indomitable; Injury Tolerance (No Blood); Single-Minded;  Temperature Tolerance 10; Unaging; Unfazeable

Disadvantages: Appearance (Monstrous; Universal); Bad Smell (Reek of the Grave); Cannot Learn; Disturbing Voice;  Fragile (Unnatural); No Sense of Smell/Taste; Reprogrammable; Social Stigma (Dead);  Unhealing (Total);  Wealth (Dead Broke)

Skills: Brawling 10 (DX+0, 1), [B182]

Plague Touch: Innate Attack: 1D tox (Cyclic: 1 sec +100%, Contact Agent (no AoE) -30%, Resistible: HT-2 -20%) [6]

Source: GURPS Magic [152], Diablo II